Posts tagged ‘Performing Arts’

March 14, 2013

March 27 is World Theatre Day

Wednesday, March 27. 2013 is WORLD THEATRE DAY

I am giving you a week’s notice so you can plan to do something other than smile weakly at someone around three pm and mutter, “uh – happy theatre day?” Read on.

As far as I can remember, everything I have ever learned, and that has mattered to me, I have learned through storytelling. And I have learned much by being told and telling stories through theatre…

D’aussi loin que je me souvienne, tout ce que j’ai appris et qui a de l’importance à mes yeux, je l’ai appris par la voie des contes. J’ai appris énormément par les histoires qu’on m’a racontées et celles que j’ai racontées au théâtre.

March 11, 2013… The Professional Association of Canadian Theatres (PACT), Playwrights Guild of Canada (PGC) and  l’Association des théâtres francophones du Canada (ATFC) have once again joined forces to promote World Theatre Day from  a distinctly Canadian  perspective.

Says Micheline Chevrier, Associate Director of Imago Theatre“I am very honoured to have been asked by PACT, PGC and ATFC to write the message on the occasion of World Theatre Day. In doing so, I have had to reflect on the importance of telling stories, taking risks and broadening one’s understanding of the world. It has been a great gift. I look forward to reading other messages and taking inspiration and strength from those thoughts into my work.”

Created in 1961 by UNESCO, World Theatre Day is celebrated annually on March 27 by theatre communities around the globe. The impetus behind World Theatre Day is to honour and further UNESCO’s International Theatre Institute’s goals to:

  • Celebrate the power of theatre as an indispensable bridge-builder for mutual international understanding and peace.
  • Promote and protect cultural diversity and identity in communities throughout the world. Each year, a renowned theatre artist of world stature is invited to craft an International Message to mark the global occasion. This year we are proud to add a distinctly Canadian voice to these messages – click here for the full text of Ms. Chevrier’s message, and watch the french version video release embedded below.

How can you or your company be a part of the celebrations? Visit the PACT website for a list of easy ways to start a conversation, make an offer to audiences, or ways to let others know you’re celebrating the importance of theatre in Canada. You can also visit the PGC website and take part in the one tweet play challenge.


For more World Theatre Day info and activities around the world, visit:

http://www.tcg.org/international/events/wtd.cfm
http://nycwtd.com/home.html
www.iti-worldwide.org/

WORLD THEATRE DAY
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
Locally, Nationally, Internationally, Live and On-line

 

January 31, 2013

A Night of Celebration and How to Hail A Cab

From my Facebook status: what a great night. celebration of the arts and arts funding at Daniels Spectrum – Artscape’s newest creation, amazing to see so much joy and power in one room, all together, friends old and new to hug and exclaim and make plans with and then out for a bite and a drink with (A Friend) who rocks my world and home safe to finish bits and pieces and think about what good things the future will bring to the arts in Toronto. Well done, all involved. To quote Che – art is power. Fought for over a decade, celebrated tonight.

I hadn’t yet been to Daniels Spectrum it was still a deep pit in the ground when I finished working at Artscape and it is a beautiful building, with a state of the art hall for events and theatre – congrats Artscape. You’ve made another beautiful building.

Last night was truly great – the mix of folks there to celebrate this arts funding from artists to city councillors to the Mayor to children running through to their art classes – really a celebration of life. Still – a long day and I was glad to head home, which leads to

Liv+Tyler+Liv+Tyler+Hailing+Cab+New+York+City+Sx9sdY8pO4PlHow To Hail A Cabbecause sometimes we need practical, non-arts marketing advice

I am excellent at hailing cabs. A US friend of mine once said, “they turn around for you – you’d do well in New York” which is still one of the best compliments I’ve ever been paid. I may have to wear reading glasses but I can spot a taxi six blocks away and get it.

Now then – the basic trick to hailing a cab is  – look like you want a taxi. I cannot stress this enough. This means –

Standing at the edge of the sidewalk by the street;
Actively looking, not playing with your phone or talking to your friends.

Hand in the air, and get it up there – whole arm up. No sad little waves, no timid finger snapping (and don’t do that anyway, because really? Snapping your fingers at someone?)

You are on the side of the road that corresponds to the direction you want to go in. Unless you want the meter started and have to go two blocks out-of-the-way or be a partner in a U-turn turned three-point turn turned twelve-point turn and now you’re holding up traffic and folks are honking. Up to you.

Keep your arm/hand in the air. Keep scanning. Try to be on/near a corner of an intersection, as it broadens your search area. Step away from the bus stop – because then you look like you’re waiting for the bus, not looking for a cab. Someone standing on the sidewalk by the edge of the street wants a cab.

If there are no cabs coming towards you, keep that arm up anyway. Why? Because there are cabs coming in the other direction and they can now see you want a cab. Listen behind you – if you hear a little peep-peep! horn – keep your arm in the air , but check the source as it’s probably a cab. Also, cabs going by with their lights off are taken, but sometimes drivers will communicate to other drivers that there is a “flagger” at X Street West and Y Avenue. Get all the taxis on your side!

Since he is going the opposite direction you will need to communicate to him to turn around – this be done with either the over the shoulder thumb movement in te direction you wish to head, or the circle the index finger turn around movement. Either one should be accompanied by mouthing or saying the words “that way“, or “other way“.

If there is a cab coming towards you and he is picking you up, odds are good he will flash his lights to indicate “I see you”. You can respond with a thumbs up, arm down and wait and keep watching them.  In my view, these actions constitute a binding contract for services on the part of both parties, so if another cab comes peeling around the corner and tries to nab you, you must shake your head no, and point at the original taxi, thus cementing the contract. They will thank you for waiting when they pull up.

If – and this rarely happens to me, but if it does – you have flagged a cab and someone a block ahead of you steals it – sorry. It’s a pain but it’s New York rules: If someone steals your cab, it wasn’t your cab.

Bonus info: If you call a taxi and wind up hailing one in the wait time for whatever reason, you must call back and tell them to cancel it. There’s a cab on the way spending time and gas to come get you – you can’t ditch them. Besides, they now have your cell number and you are the person who calls and ditches. Poor form.

And that’s how you hail a cab.

September 28, 2012

Post Now, Nap Later, Consult in the Fall

 

 

Found this article in the Globe yesterday.

Fun fact: that’s pretty much my schedule. One of the joys of owning your own business is that to an extent you get to follow your own schedule. I’ve always been a bit useless between 2 and 3 – so I don’t try to do anything that requires creative thought.

Found this in the Star: How to retrieve accidentally deleted computer files – which usually happens between 2 nd 3 in my house.

This? Is fantastic. Making Space for Culture: Public Consultations Fall 2012

To secure space for the arts from the ground up, the cultural community must be proactive, identifying potential partners in health, social services or sports when they are in the planning stages of projects such as community hubs and recreation centres.

To help guide future potential investment when opportunities arise, Toronto’s Cultural Services has embarked on a ward-by-ward consultation and planning process to determine local priorities…Twenty ward consultations will be conducted in 2012 with the remaining 24 wards being surveyed in 2013 and beyond. Ten sessions were held in the spring with 10 more to follow in October. An online survey is being conducted as part of the consultation process, dubbed Making Space for Culture: Ward Planning for Vibrant, Sustainable Cultural Infrastructure. Please take a moment to fill out the survey and join us at any of the consultations.

 

 

September 12, 2012

Hiding Words – ticket deal!

It’s my birthday today! This past year has quite possibly been one of the best years of my life. With that in mind, I am sharing the love and passing on a cool ticket deal for Gein Wong’s play HIDING WORDS (for you).

Hiding Words (for you)  delves into nushu, a secret language created in 400 A.D. when Chinese women were not allowed to read or write. Set in China during its biggest 19th Century rebellion, a modern Canada where national security is at a heightened state, and a hip urban Hong Kong on the eve of the Beijing Olympics. This interdisciplinary play examines the relationship between women connected through space and time, following their pursuits to influence social change.

Gein Wong has done some amazing work, theatrically inventive, passionate, fearless, organically blending traditional Chinese motifs with video installation, hip hop, modern dance.

Esther Jun directs, and the cast includes the powerful John Ng, Stephanie Jung, Paul Lee and others. It’s running at Harbourfront from September 13 to the  23, 2012.

Book your tickets online, or you can book by email at websales@harbourfrontcentre.com or by phone at 416-973-4000. You can quote the promo code  NUSHU for $21 tickets.  I’ll be going.

September 6, 2012

14th in Innovation – Mom isn’t putting that grade on the fridge

From the Globe and Mail: Canada must refuel for cultural creativity

Sixty years ago, the Massey report created our first cultural “road map” by boldly recommending the establishment of a Canada Council to support our creative and interpretive artists.

Its recommendations also strongly encouraged a National Library and the growth of our core national cultural institutions: CBC-Radio Canada, the National Film Board, our archives and museums and scientific research. It affirmed the importance of culture to Canadian society and linked the development of a distinctive Canadian culture to our sovereignty and survival.

These recommendations produced remarkably positive results. However, culture has since been relegated to “niche” status under successive governments, and the cultural sector as a whole has been relegated to the periphery of policy-making.

So that was sixty years ago. Now from the Guardian: Why major theatre institutions should be left to die

The artists of tomorrow are not made through funding an elite, but by funding at the bottom of the pyramid – a pyramid that we have created and sustained during the good times but now seldom question, even though the landscape will look very different in the coming years.

We should stop building bricks and mortar and empires, and rid ourselves of the belief that growth is a good thing for the arts. We should put money into the bottom of the pyramid, not the top – it is only by funding the bottom that we can create the future.

Lots to think about.

In other news, our Mayor is in court proving spectacularly that stupidity isn’t illegal. Steve Kupferman from torontoist did some great live updating yesterday.

August 30, 2012

An Announcement from Metcalf and A Dance Current Job Op

Announcement: New Programs to Support Performing Arts – Town Hall Meetings, Metcalf Foundation

In June 2012, the Metcalf Foundation decided to bring down the curtain on their Strategic Initiatives funding program.  Over the past 12 years, Metcalf has awarded 115 SI grants to 84 different small and mid-sized professional performing arts companies in Toronto, representing a total financial commitment of over $11 million.

Metcalf remains committed to its work of building multi-year partnerships with organizations in the performing arts, conscious of the importance of a healthy performing arts sector to a strong and vibrant city.  During 2012, the Foundation has been examining the SI program in order to determine how we can be more effective with our support for these companies and build collective impact by enabling collaborative learning or activity.

In the fall of 2012, they will be announcing a significant new program to support the performing arts.  They will be presenting our framework for this new program in three town hall meetings.

September 11, 2012; 3:30 pm at The Citadel (the studios of Coleman Lemieux et compagnie, 304 Parliament Street at Dundas)

September 12, 2012; 12:00 pm at the Canadian Music Centre (20 St. Joseph Street, one block north of Wellesley at Yonge)

September 19, 2012; 9:30 am at The Fringe Creation Lab (720 Bathurst Street, Suite 403, south of Bloor

In addition to presenting the new program, the Foundation will be looking for important input from the sector regarding specific areas of focus for our work in the upcoming year.  Please RSVP for one of these town hall meetings by contacting Program Director Michael Jones (mjones@metcalffoundation.com) or Grants Manager Heather Dunford hdunford@metcalffoundation.com).

ALSO!

Request for Proposals to Provide Management Services, CADAC

CADAC is seeking an independent managing consultant to lead the organization through a pivotal period in its development and beyond. The consultant will work closely with the Board, members and stakeholders to manage all aspects of the not-for-profit’s business and guide the organization towards greater autonomy and sustainable self-sufficiency.  CADAC (Canadian Arts Data) is an independent not-for-profit corporation serving professional arts organizations and funding bodies at all levels of government across Canada.

The deadline for proposals is September 20th, 2012. The Request for Proposals is linked below.

https://www.lecadac.ca/documents/RFP-Managing-Consultant-CADAC.pdf

August 10, 2012

Two Very Different Shows

HOMEbody and Proud – and I am pleased to be working on them both.

August 9, 2012

Pro-Artist/Anti-Institution, PTTP deadlines and a Book Sale!

My computer has been acting up this week, especially with blogging. I think it’s time for a physical.

Anyway, I thought this was an interesting article and so am sharing it with you.

When did being pro-artist make one anti-institution?

Interesting paragraph:

The artistic director of a large institutional theater referred to me as “pro-artist” a few years back. It was meant to be a derogatory comment. When did being “pro-artist” make one an enemy of resident theaters? When did large theater institutions begin to see their own interests as threatened by the interests of artists? And do we think this is a positive development for the American theater?

I find it disturbing that those that have attempted to shine a light on the needs of artists and the fact that those working in institutions have fared rather well relative to the artists they employ over the past thirty years, are now seen as divisive.

In other news, Theatre Ontario has reminded us that the October 1 deadline is coming up for the Professional Theatre Training Program

Our Professional Theatre Training Program (PTTP) offers financial support for unique and flexible training with a chosen mentor in any theatrical discipline except performance.

And finally – Playwrights Guild is having a Summer Book Sale!  you got your Michael Ondaatje, your Rick Salutin, your George F. Walker, your Moynan King and many others. Take a wander to their website to see what they have and how to get it.

June 28, 2012

Yesterday’s Marketing Quiz and Get Ready for Fringe!

Yesterday’s post had a quick link to a marketing quiz, and I said I absolutely agreed with the correct answer. Why?

It goes back to your audience – knowing who they are and interacting with them. And it ties into the Fringe Festival – which is coming up next week!

There are over 150 shows to see. How do people choose? They talk to other people. And as a marketer of your (or your friend’s) Fringe show, you should talk to people as well. I spend a lot of time seeing shows, and at the Fringe Club. Something that makes me sad is the flyer handed to me, or dropped on the table in front of me without a word.  Phantom flyers. Sure a flyer has all the information – times, dates, image, Fringe logo, blurb – but I would have preferred talking to you about your show and why I should see it. (Item: talking. NOT pitching. I hate being pitched, it’s not a dialogue. I once told someone to stop pitching at me and they didn’t. Forget it.)

If you can get people truly interested in your work, they will tell others. Pretty much guaranteed. If you silently drop a flyer in front of me it’s pretty much guaranteed it will stay on that table until it gets thrown away. I don’t remember who dropped this piece of paper in front of me. I do remember talking to people about their show.

Talk. Exchange ideas. Interact. The Fringe Club is one of the best places on earth to talk to other artists and other folks who love art (which there is a TON of this year. A TON.) I know you’re running around like a maniac, postering, flyering lineups, everything. But the two minutes it takes to become a real person and talk – that’s what will sell you a ticket. (Item: If you’re not good at being a real person, you can still talk to me as your character. I will talk to you. I’ve had more conversations with Morro and Jasp then I have with Heather and Amy and loved every one.)

SIX DAYS till the Fringe! I’m choosing my shows and booking my tickets today.

June 5, 2012

Fringe Marketing? Meet Your Future

Fringe is in a few weeks! Have you made some choices yet? Go to the spanky fun new website and pick some shows!
I may have mentioned The 100 in previous posts, but – they’ve launched. They’re real now – they aren’t just hopes and dreams and google application docs – they’re – a force.
Fun fact: am doing a marketing workshop panel for this force in a couple of weeks and I can’t wait.
The 100 is just that – 100 young theatre lovers aged 17-24 who will be part of a  12 day immersive theatre entrepreneur bootcamp at the Fringe Festival.

The Members of the 100, get behind-the-scenes access and a free VIP pass to Toronto’s largest theatre festival.

They get on the ground immersion while producing street theatre and guerrilla marketing that they will have creative control over.

They will be launched into the middle of the action and given hands-on experience working alongside Fringe staff and networking with top indie theatre artists and mentors from the ‘biz’.

More info on the Praxis blog from their fearless leader Pip – Five Reasons You Wish You Could Be In My Youth outreach Program. My favourite part?
As the Youth Outreach Coordinator for the Toronto Fringe Festival, I am finally achieving a Fringe Dream five years in the making: I get to hang out at the Fringe Club all day long while people come visit me in my clubhouse, The 100 Salon. No, seriously, I have a salon
.

I think I know where I will be when I’m not in a show.

Look at these people. Look closely. Yes, they are chewing on my business cards. This is the future (the very near, in just over a month future) of Fringe marketing.

I can’t wait.

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